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The Sally Gardens - Arty McGlynn - McGlynns Fancy (Vinyl, LP) download full album zip cd mp3 vinyl flac

Down by the Salley Gardens has an unusual background for a song that has passed into the Irish folk music tradition. Nevertheless, it has become one of the most recorded Irish songs of all time and has attracted the attention of performers from widely different musical backgrounds. Ironically, considering it was written by a great poet regarded by many as a literary genius, the song is one of the simplest you will find anywhere in the Irish music repertoire.

It all ends in tears. We are not told why but the presumption is that he tried to move too fast and so frightened her away. In a note on the poem, he said that he was trying to reconstruct an old song he had heard being sung by a woman in the village of Ballisodare in Sligo. He could only remember a few lines but acknowledged his debt to the original version by calling his new poem, An Old Song Re-sung.

It was only changed to the Salley Gardens when it was published again in in his collection, Poems. The song that Yeats heard the old woman singing was almost certainly the old Irish tune, You Rambling Boys of Pleasure. Its second verse contains the lines:.

I spied this pretty fair maid and these words to me she did say. But I was young and foolish and with my darling could not agree. The words are very similar to Down by the Salley Gardens and it seems safe to assume that You Rambling Boys of Pleasure was the song Yeats heard being sung by the old woman. It refers to the young woman changing her mind about the relationship and money is said to play a part.

Down by the Salley Gardens gives no specific reason for the failure of the relationship, and the effect may be stronger as we are left to make up our own minds. Down by the Salley Gardens was written as a poem and remained that way until when Herbert Hughes set it to music using the old Irish melody, The Maids of Mourne Shore.

Salley or sally comes from the Gaelic word saileach which means willow. The Salley The Sally Gardens - Arty McGlynn - McGlynns Fancy (Vinyl therefore simply means willow gardens. Slender shoots of willow were used to bind thatched roofs and so it was common to find small willow plantations close to villages in Ireland. As well as providing willow shoots for thatching, they doubled up as a meeting place for young lovers. McGinty and Carlin represent Derry.

Bono hopes to get better and better. Celtic Thunder - the kings of Social Media. In my view and given that John McCall died inwhich gave him had thirteen years in which to construct this from his memory of another old song and his knowledge of Yeats' poem — the first two verses are too little different from Yeats' poem to be its origin rather than derived from it. FromHugh Shields, a Lecturer in Medieval French at Trinity, collected songs across Ireland, especially in north Derry, and allied them with ballad sheets.

His knowledge of the working of tradition was very extensive. If anyone wants the precise references, Michael Yeats' lecture was later published, I can supply them.

And I always thought this was a nice bit to have on the end of a relatively short song. John Moulden's note from yesterday includes the words "as the stream flows o'er the weirs", which seems more appropriate than "as the grass grows on the weirs", unless there's the intention to suggest the passage of many years i. This would be consistent with the leaves growing over some time on the trees rather than their falling from them, an image more linked to age than to youth.

Since there aren't, as far as I can see, any other discussions about this song, I wonder if I might ask here what interpretations people put on it? It's clearly cast as a memory, but of how long previously? Did the singer regularly meet the female, or did he only see her the once, passing by in the bare feet, and fall for her "at first sight"? How long after did she tell him to get lost; did he even follow her from the Salley Gardens as far as the field by the river all on the one day?

What reasons might there be for his still LP) full of tears, assuming that he is no longer Young and Foolish but, at most, one of these? Answers on very large postcards. They "lean" together; she places her hand on his shoulder; she talks to him in a familiar way. However, his urgency, his "neediness", perhaps his seriousness, his self-righteousness, his ambition, his inflexibility, is too much for her, and she dumps him.

Now that is, in the eternal present of the poemhe is no longer "young and foolish" in the sense that the speaker in the Houseman poem is no longer so: chronologically, perhaps only a few months have passed, but the speaker feels much older, sadder, and wiser. That does preclude his still being "full of tears", by any means. Cheers, George Salley. Like a number of Houseman's poems it makes a nice little song on its own and has been set to music by Butterworth.

Sally Gardens is also a good enough song to stand on its own. They both deserve better than being tagged on to each other to make it a decent length song what is a decent length for a song anyway? I'm thoroughly in accord with your third sentence, not least in the number and variety of possible explanations, but do tend to see the singer as remembering youthful experience from a long time ago, which does lead to the complication of wondering why he's still full of tears, presumably about the experience mentioned.

On the other hand, it's a song that works without any need for such analysis. Subject: RE: Origin: Sally Gardens From: ChillToad Date: 26 Mar 10 - PM I extend the song by singing the two standard verses, then combine the first half of the first verse with the second half of the second verse if that makes sense.

I've heard the " I go for the "Down boy, love mustn't be rushed or you'll ruin it" followed by "Well you've blown that, hope you don't spoil the rest of your life in the same way" kind of view. Or maybe I'm just projecting I've worked in a number of historic forts for the National Park Service, some of them places that had forts at one time that still retain some of the old functional names.

I haven't worked at any castles, but it would apply there as well. The Sally Port is the back or postern gate out of a fort or fortified place like a castle ; when I worked at the Statue of Liberty atop the old star-shaped Fort Woodthe sally port was the smaller back door we used to take people out if we didn't want to go through the big front doors. A door like that is secure, and while it is strategic for sending out troops when needed in a fight, is useful for when you're living and working in a fort and want to work on the grounds around the outside of it.

Like in the garden. If you don't have room inside for a kitchen garden, it's practical that it be close to the fort walls, and near the door into the domestic area of the fort, etc. To see the sally port at the Statue of Liberty Fort Wood when it was there alone with no pedestal or statue get the movie Splash. When Darryl Hannah comes ashore in NYC to find the Tom Hanks character they pretend it is the front entrance to the statue, but it was actually filmed at the sally port they just closed The Sally Gardens - Arty McGlynn - McGlynns Fancy (Vinyl of the island for filming, but they didn't close the island to visitors.

She has his wallet with her, and arrives nude on the grounds at the statue. Ron Howard's folks didn't tell the NPS that there was nudity in the scene--that freaked them out a little. So, the sally garden in that context is the kitchen garden or it could be a pleasure garden outside the alternate exit from the fort. In skimming all of the LP) above about sally gardens in various localities I didn't see anything that would suggest that there wasn't a fort or castle nearby that had a sally port that gave the garden it's name.

I'd be willing to bet real money that the terms sally port and sally garden were in use for a long time in the UK or Europe before they made their way over here, possibly as artifacts of activities that happened in a given area long time ago. In communities that had some history of an old fortified structure, it makes sense that there are a few sally gardens around the English-speaking world.

I sounds to me like grasping at straws to convert salix willow to give the name to the garden. It just doesn't make sense. I have the impression that willow is more likely to be called withy rather than sally. The sally port is only a vague possibility and not in my view very likely. Withy is the English dialect word for willow - sally is the Irish.

It is widely used as in the Dublin children's version of the Cruel Mother popularized by the Dubliners - Down by the river Sailagh. Maybe older names from the 'Celtic' Britons who were conquered by the Romans and then by the Saxons and Normans but many of whose placenames live on. A passage area with a garden nearby?

Sally is much more likely to have come from the Latin for willow, salix. Subject: Lyr. Add: Down by the Salley Gardens W.

Yeats 1 Down by the salley gardens my love and I did meet; She passed the salley gardens with little snow-white feet. She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree; But I, being young and foolish, with her would not agree.

She bid me take life easy, as the grass grows on the weirs; But I was young and foolish, and now am full of tears. An Anthology of Modern Verseed. I stand corrected well sit actually! Together with the instrumental verse it makes a satisfying arrangement. Superb performance all round. Notice the attribution "lyrics: trad - pub. W B Yeats ". That's quite a relief. What a minefield! Oliver St.

John Gogarty, the late Irish writer and physician and, incidentally, the prototype of James Joyce's Buck Mulligan, told me the following anecdote. As the famous pianissimo died away, and before the thunder of applause, Yeats turned to Gogarty and whispered, "Were it not for the damnable articularity of the man!

Does anyone know whether "sally" or "salley" is the preferred spelling? As Yeats rendered it "salley" perhaps we should prefer that. I suppose it would be easier if you could actually keep a straight face while saying it Not the first time ol' WB has left me bewildered They're both believed to be loanwords from Latin. Nilson, Timber trees of New South Wales; also later.

Old word, 14th C. In poetry by Shelley, Tennyson and Cowper as well as Yeats. No particular willow species is indicated. All of the above from the OED. Since I read the quote I've been secretly hoping that someone would accuse me of damnable articularity, but no one I know has any idea what it means either.

One of several eucalypts or acacias that resemble willows in habit or appearance; see quot. Hickory; Sally. Called variously 'Hickory'. Also known as Sally or Muzzlewood. Black sallee and white sallee are the names standardized in the timber trade for the cold-loving Eucalyptus stellulata and E. Acacia floribunda and A. Then I entered "salley" and was given the choice of "sallow" or "sally" so I selected "sallow" and it brought me to this: Forms:. See also E. A plant of the genus Salix, a willow; chiefly, in narrower sense, as distinguished from 'osier' and 'willow', applied to several species of Salix of a low-growing or shrubby habit: see quot.

Also, one of the shoots of a willow. Rolls Surtees In posicione de Sallowys juxta ripam de Wer, xxd. Is worthy to been hanged on the galwes! Dyeing 76 Take cole of a willo or sallo. In colour like the satin-shining palm On sallows in the windy gleams of March. Caprea, and the allied species, which are not flexible like the osier, but furnish the best charcoal for gunpowder. July 38 The yellow sallows, locally sallys, which the cottage children call palms, flame in gold. Psalter cxxxvi. The wood of the sallow tree.

Chantry Surv. Surtees I. Turner Select. Oxford Spoylinge of hasells, salleys, and other woods readie for sale. Board Agric. Blind The old harp., The Sally Gardens - Arty McGlynn - McGlynns Fancy (Vinyl. Plants ed. Salix caprea This is perhaps the most common of all our willows. Art II. Special comb. Comes on about the twentieth of May It is a four winged fly; as it swims down the water its wings lie flat on its back.

Silver Wattle; Sallow. Grist for the mill!

Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for McGlynn's Fancy [Vinyl LP] at balnalatelesupprosivadisbere.coinfo Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. Today’s photos are from Sally Barker in Baltimore, Maryland. We’ve visited Sally’s garden twice before (HERE and HERE), but this is our first look at her garden in fall. Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Sally Barker. Sally says, “Here are some photos of our garden in early through late fall taken over a few years. The Japanese maples are. Jul 09,  · Sally Gagner McGlynn Our kind, gracious, smart, and beautiful mother passed away peacefully surrounded by the love of her children, their spouses, and . Delivering music since JW Pepper ® is your sheet music store for band, orchestra and choral music, piano sheet music, worship songs, songbooks and more. Download and buy printable sheet music online at JW Pepper. ®. Mcglynn's Fancy: Mcglynn, Arty: balnalatelesupprosivadisbere.coinfo: Music. Skip to main balnalatelesupprosivadisbere.coinfo Hello, Sign in. Account & Lists Sign Music Vinyl Records Today's Deals New Releases Best Sellers Canadian Artists Classical Browse Genres Recommendations Musique Music › Reviews: 4. Arty McGlynn. This CD is mis-titled: it is Celtic but not strictly airs. Arty McGlynn is an obviously facile guitarist and more importantly a wonderful musician. My wife, a harp and keyboard player is similarly delighted with the CD, so your odds are 2/2. Down By the Salley Gardens By William Butler Yeats About this Poet William Butler Yeats is widely considered to be one of the greatest poets of the 20th century. He belonged to the Protestant, Anglo-Irish minority that had controlled the economic, political, social, and cultural life of Ireland since at least the end of the 17th century. Dec 31,  · Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises Sally Gardens · Rosalind McAllister Celtic Ladies ℗ Madacy Entertainment LP Released on: Auto-generated by YouTube. Location. It has been suggested that the location of the "Salley Gardens" was on the banks of the river at Ballysadare near Sligo where the residents cultivated trees to provide roof thatching materials. "Salley" or "sally" is a form of the Standard English word "sallow", i.e., a tree of the genus balnalatelesupprosivadisbere.coinfo is close in sound to the Irish word saileach, meaning willow. Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Arty McGlynn - McGlynn's Fancy at Discogs. Complete your Arty McGlynn collection/5(4).


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8 Replies to “ The Sally Gardens - Arty McGlynn - McGlynns Fancy (Vinyl, LP) ”

  1. Down By the Salley Gardens By William Butler Yeats About this Poet William Butler Yeats is widely considered to be one of the greatest poets of the 20th century. He belonged to the Protestant, Anglo-Irish minority that had controlled the economic, political, social, and cultural life of Ireland since at least the end of the 17th century.
  2. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this balnalatelesupprosivadisbere.coinfo balnalatelesupprosivadisbere.coinfo’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.
  3. Down by the Sally Gardens, my love and I did meet. She crossed the Sally Gardens with little snow-white feet. She bid me take love easy, as the leaves grow on the tree, But I was young and foolish, and with her did not agree. Back to Song List. Bookings: ()
  4. Kajitilar says: Reply
    View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the Vinyl release of McGlynn's Fancy on Discogs. Label: Mint Records (5) - JULEP 16 • Format: Vinyl LP, Album • Country: Ireland • 5/5(1).
  5. This collection features audio collections reflecting music, art and culture. Collections include the unique contemporary compositions and performances found in the Other Minds collection, the hundreds of popular songs from the early 20th Century found in the 78 RPM collection and oral history.
  6. Down by the sally gardens Traditionnel 2 pianos 4 hands (duet) 1 PDF / MIDI / Intermediate (6) Adaptator: Darkmind, Tom. Added the Down by the Salley Gardens (Version 1 - high) Traditionnel Clarinet, Guitar 3 PDF / 2 MP3 Play-along / Easy Adaptator: .
  7. Today’s photos are from Sally Barker in Baltimore, Maryland. We’ve visited Sally’s garden twice before (HERE and HERE), but this is our first look at her garden in fall. Photo/Illustration: Courtesy of Sally Barker. Sally says, “Here are some photos of our garden in early through late fall taken over a few years. The Japanese maples are.
  8. Mikashakar says: Reply
    Discover releases, reviews, credits, songs, and more about Arty McGlynn - McGlynn's Fancy at Discogs. Complete your Arty McGlynn collection/5(4).

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